United States Presidential Election, 2008

Introduction

This is a revision of the United States presidential election of 2008.

This election is revamped, particularly in that both the Republican and Democratic candidates for president have been replaced. John McCain is replaced by Alan Keyes, and Barack Obama is replaced by Hillary Clinton.

Why Keyes for Republican nominee, one might ask? Because Obama’s black, well technically he’s only 50% black at maximum. And I can think of at least seven black men who’d make a better President than Obama, and Alan Keyes is one of them.

On the Republican side, Keyes, former Maryland Senator serving from 1989 to 2001, makes a successful 2nd attempt at the race for Republican presidential nominee. In the beginning, the race is somewhat hotly contested between Keyes and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, but due to massive donations to Keyes from hardcore patriotic celebrities allying themselves with the Grassroots Patriotic American movement, as well as the fact that Giuliani is relatively little known outside the Northeast, Keyes ends up winning the nomination by a landslide. Disgraced former Arizona Senator John McCain (ousted in this revision in the Arizona U.S. Senate Republican primary of 2004) and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, both RINOs, as well as other weaker Republican candidates, lag far behind Keyes and Giuliani.

On the Democratic side, I’m thinking Barack Obama is completely out of the picture. (Here’s the scenario I’m thinking might work here: Thanks to the efforts of Maricopa County, Arizona then-Sheriff Joe Arpaio around 2003/2004 providing solid proof that Obama was born in Kenya and not a U.S. citizen, Obama is thus disqualified from holding and running for public office. See the Notes section at the bottom of the page for more info.) With Obama gone, former First Lady Hillary Clinton massacres her opponents to become the Democratic nominee for President. (And no, she is never elected Senator in New York, and doesn’t even win the Democratic primary for the Senate seat. She loses to JFK Jr., who then goes on to become New York Senator instead. See the Notes section at the bottom of the page for the explanation for JFK Jr.)

Following Alan Keyes clinching the Republican nomination, he picks Joe Arpaio to be his running mate. I have not yet figured out who Hillary Clinton’s running mate would be. In the November election, Alan Keyes defeats Hillary in a monumental landslide, with Keyes receiving 74.9% of the popular vote to Hillary’s 23.6%, for a victory margin of more than 51 percentage points. Keyes wins all 50 states by double digits as Ronald Reagan had done in 1984; and in the District of Columbia (AKA Washington, DC), Keyes only loses to Hillary by just under a 3.5 percentage margin, making the district a presidential battleground for the first time in history!

As a side note, there will be a special election for Sheriff of Maricopa County, since Arpaio must leave his position to become Vice President of the U.S. This election goes heavily for the Republican candidate, of course.

The background to the 2008 U.S. presidential election involves President George W. Bush being something of a lame duck president, due to his leanings toward establishment Republicans and Democrats and his virtual lack of progress in the War on Terror following 9/11 and the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. President Bush had to be pushed to the right by the patriots in Congress, and his true colors show when he vetoes numerous repeals and some pieces of pro-patriot legislation, which are all overridden by Congress.

The revised election below is organized state-by-state in alphabetical order, for a total of 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

United States presidential election, 2008 (results estimated)

Alabama

Alan Keyes (R): 1,604,411 (81.8%)
Hillary Clinton (D): 326,766 (16.7%)
Other: 30,205 (1.5%)
Total: 1,961,382

Alaska

Keyes: 224,137 (78.4%)
Clinton: 57,064 (20%)
Other: 4,543 (1.6%)
Total: 285,744

Arizona

Keyes: 1,049,169 (75.7%)
Clinton: 315,637 (22.8%)
Other: 20,784 (1.5%)
Total: 1,385,590

Arkansas

Keyes: 1,103,950 (78.8%)
Clinton: 276,583 (19.7%)
Other: 21,308 (1.5%)
Total: 1,401,841

California

Keyes: 10,450,820 (74.8%)
Clinton: 3,304,889 (23.7%)
Other: 206,643 (1.5%)
Total: 13,962,352

Colorado

Keyes: 1,302,411 (75.1%)
Clinton: 406,201 (23.4%)
Other: 26,548 (1.5%)
Total: 1,735,160

Connecticut

Keyes: 1,258,291 (66%)
Clinton: 618,951 (32.5%)
Other: 28,394 (1.5%)
Total: 1,905,636

Delaware

Keyes: 233,111 (65.4%)
Clinton: 118,177 (33.1%)
Other: 5,205 (1.5%)
Total: 356,493

District of Columbia

Clinton: 147,658 (51%)
Keyes: 137,720 (47.5%)
Other: 4,375 (1.5%)
Total: 289,753

Florida

Keyes: 4,605,505 (81.5%)
Clinton: 962,589 (17%)
Other: 84,219 (1.5%)
Total: 5,652,313

Georgia

Keyes: 2,208,205 (84.2%)
Clinton: 374,107 (14.3%)
Other: 39,325 (1.5%)
Total: 2,621,637

Hawaii

Keyes: 313,339 (65.1%)
Clinton: 160,688 (33.4%)
Other: 7,072 (1.5%)
Total: 481,099

Idaho

Keyes: 554,223 (79.1%)
Clinton: 135,982 (19.4%)
Other: 10,368 (1.5%)
Total: 700,573

Illinois

Keyes: 5,879,361 (74.2%)
Clinton: 1,917,029 (24.2%)
Other: 121,942 (1.5%)
Total: 7,918,332

Indiana

Keyes: 2,487,099 (76.5%)
Clinton: 718,545 (22.1%)
Other: 47,166 (1.5%)
Total: 3,252,810

Iowa

Keyes: 1,441,775 (74%)
Clinton: 478,772 (24.6%)
Other: 28,851 (1.5%)
Total: 1,949,398

Kansas

Keyes: 1,114,706 (78.2%)
Clinton: 289,256 (20.3%)
Other: 20,946 (1.5%)
Total: 1,424,908

Kentucky

Keyes: 1,515,955 (75.6%)
Clinton: 459,076 (22.9%)
Other: 29,670 (1.5%)
Total: 2,004,701

Louisiana

Keyes: 1,905,971 (78.3%)
Clinton: 491,157 (20.2%)
Other: 36,751 (1.5%)
Total: 2,433,879

Maine

Keyes: 566,085 (67.7%)
Clinton: 257,578 (30.8%)
Other: 12,628 (1.5%)
Total: 836,291

Maryland

Keyes: 1,763,124 (73.2%)
Clinton: 609,469 (25.3%)
Other: 36,375 (1.5%)
Total: 2,408,968

Massachusetts

Keyes: 2,801,431 (70.3%)
Clinton: 1,121,688 (28.2%)
Other: 60,147 (1.5%)
Total: 3,983,266

Michigan

Keyes: 4,501,138 (72.9%)
Clinton: 1,578,545 (25.6%)
Other: 91,331 (1.5%)
Total: 6,171,014

Minnesota

Keyes: 1,734,584 (58.3%)
Clinton: 1,196,973 (40.2%)
Other: 45,247 (1.5%)
Total: 2,976,804

Mississippi

Keyes: 1,248,208 (85.8%)
Clinton: 183,488 (12.6%)
Other: 22,245 (1.5%)
Total: 1,453,941

Missouri

Keyes: 2,453,386 (74.5%)
Clinton: 791,766 (24%)
Other: 49,753 (1.5%)
Total: 3,294,905

Montana

Keyes: 426,989 (74.1%)
Clinton: 140,601 (24.4%)
Other: 8,644 (1.5%)
Total: 576,234

Nebraska

Keyes: 823,053 (80.6%)
Clinton: 183,594 (18%)
Other: 15,018 (1.5%)
Total: 1,021,665

Nevada

Keyes: 330,286 (74%)
Clinton: 109,470 (24.5%)
Other: 6,697 (1.5%)
Total: 446,453

New Hampshire

Keyes: 461,083 (74.4%)
Clinton: 149,502 (24.1%)
Other: 8,984 (1.5%)
Total: 619,569

New Jersey

Keyes: 3,686,626 (75.5%)
Clinton: 1,122,902 (23%)
Other: 70,835 (1.5%)
Total: 4,880,363

New Mexico

Keyes: 518,570 (67.6%)
Clinton: 237,520 (30.9%)
Other: 11,592 (1.5%)
Total: 767,682

New York

Keyes: 8,885,052 (73.8%)
Clinton: 2,981,359 (24.7%)
Other: 179,484 (1.5%)
Total: 12,045,895

North Carolina

Keyes: 2,669,263 (79.5%)
Clinton: 636,018 (18.9%)
Other: 51,016 (1.5%)
Total: 3,356,297

North Dakota

Keyes: 360,065 (75.7%)
Clinton: 108,748 (22.9%)
Other: 6,898 (1.5%)
Total: 475,711

Ohio

Keyes: 5,142,561 (75.9%)
Clinton: 1,530,775 (22.6%)
Other: 103,000 (1.5%)
Total: 6,776,336

Oklahoma

Keyes: 1,323,571 (82.9%)
Clinton: 249,188 (15.6%)
Other: 24,599 (1.5%)
Total: 1,597,358

Oregon

Keyes: 1,001,768 (64.9%)
Clinton: 519,854 (33.7%)
Other: 22,411 (1.5%)
Total: 1,544,033

Pennsylvania

Keyes: 5,640,157 (74%)
Clinton: 1,863,804 (24.5%)
Other: 112,727 (1.5%)
Total: 7,616,688

Rhode Island

Keyes: 363,060 (55.8%)
Clinton: 278,071 (42.7%)
Other: 9,631 (1.5%)
Total: 650,762

South Carolina

Keyes: 1,211,159 (80.2%)
Clinton: 276,094 (18.3%)
Other: 23,109 (1.5%)
Total: 1,510,362

South Dakota

Keyes: 377,092 (74.4%)
Clinton: 122,066 (24.1%)
Other: 7,550 (1.5%)
Total: 506,708

Tennessee

Keyes: 1,957,891 (77.6%)
Clinton: 527,687 (20.9%)
Other: 36,827 (1.5%)
Total: 2,522,405

Texas

Keyes: 6,365,185 (78.8%)
Clinton: 1,597,156 (19.8%)
Other: 120,433 (1.5%)
Total: 8,082,774

Utah

Keyes: 774,740 (82.5%)
Clinton: 150,777 (16.1%)
Other: 13,903 (1.5%)
Total: 939,420

Vermont

Keyes: 223,942 (67.8%)
Clinton: 101,195 (30.7%)
Other: 4,918 (1.5%)
Total: 330,055

Virginia

Keyes: 2,325,365 (78.3%)
Clinton: 597,595 (20.1%)
Other: 45,718 (1.5%)
Total: 2,968,678

Washington

Keyes: 1,622,668 (63.9%)
Clinton: 877,454 (34.6%)
Other: 38,073 (1.5%)
Total: 2,538,195

West Virginia

Keyes: 935,933 (73.9%)
Clinton: 311,850 (24.6%)
Other: 19,388 (1.5%)
Total: 1,267,171

Wisconsin

Keyes: 2,383,430 (71.9%)
Clinton: 883,673 (26.7%)
Other: 48,743 (1.5%)
Total: 3,315,846

Wyoming

Keyes: 233,141 (86.9%)
Clinton: 30,983 (11.5%)
Other: 4,131 (1.5%)
Total: 268,255

United States (total)

Keyes: 104,500,765 (74.9%)
Clinton: 32,886,570 (23.6%)
Other: 2,086,370 (1.5%)
Total: 139,473,705

Notes

  • On the topic of Obama, after being ousted from American politics, he flees to Kenya where he attempts to run for President or some other position; he loses, then resorts to tactics such as an unsuccessful coup attempt which leads to him being arrested and jailed and/or executed. Hey, it’s better than him wrecking the U.S. Constitution for eight years as an illegitimate U.S. president, no?
  • On the topic of JFK Jr., there are “conspiracy theories”, which I believe, that JFK Jr. was forced in the current version of history to fake his 1999 “plane crash death” and withdraw from public life due to a powerful Deep State seeking to take his life.
  1. During the Reagan years (1981-1989) of my revised history, President Ronald Reagan leads a much more successful revolution in comparison to current history. Throughout these Reagan years, Congress is controlled significantly by the Republican Party, who make considerable gains in 1978, and especially in 1980, when they seize control of the House of Representatives and Senate. This Congress is thus loyal to Reagan and more importantly the U.S. Constitution. This enables Reagan to severely weaken the Deep State so that it’s far less powerful when JFK Jr. enters the political scene.
  2. There are still assassination attempts on President Reagan’s life, the most prominent one being in 1981 with John Hinckley, who in revised history is even less successful since he is able to fire only one bullet, which does hit Reagan. But Hinckley is tackled to the ground and apprehended even more quickly than in current history. The rest of the attempts fail miserably.
  3. In any event, JFK Jr. remains in public, but in 2002, the Democratic Party leaves him as they had done to so many other “conservative” Democrats. So he subsequently joins the Republican Party. As a side note, in 2006, he is reelected to the U.S. Senate as a Republican in New York, then declines to seek a third term, as Alan Keyes had done as U.S. Senator from Maryland.
  • Because Alan Keyes wins this election, of course, he automatically becomes President-elect, and becomes President early the following year. Now, since most presidents have had presidential nicknames, I’m thinking Keyes, at least before being elected, will be nicknamed ALK, which stands for Alan Lee Keyes, his full name. And on that note, I think his main winning slogan will be “ALK is A-OK!” Sounds good, doesn’t it?

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